News From Indian County 12 01 2015 E Edition Page 1

DECEMBER 2015 NEWS FROM INDIAN COUNTRY: www.IndianCountryNews.com PAGE 1 Iroquois Beadwork goes on display at Neville, Page 7 When the Natives get restless, by Winona LaDuke, Page 9 Canada $3/U.S. $2.00 www.IndianCountryNews.com December 2015 - Vol. XXIX No. 12 Remembering John Trudell, author, actor... By Sandra Schulman News From Indian Country I ve been aware of John Trudell for at least 30 years, as a journalist for Native and mainstream publications, I came across his name and work through his music and movies and activism. He was already kind of legendary, a scrappy tough rangy coyote, with fire in his eyes and belly. I finally met him when I was working with the Native American Music Association and he came to present, perform, and ultimately to accept a Living Legend Award, presented to him by John News From Indian Country 8558N County Road K Hayward, WI 54843-5800 COP21 Paris, France - (ICC) Thousands gathered in Paris for the United Nation's climate talks that began on November 30 and ran through December 11, 2015. Among the world leaders in Paris, including President Barack Obama, are indigenous peoples from around the world. The SPIRET Foundation released the following statement to the media overnight that provides a voice to the indigenous peoples of the North America: Indigenous Elders and Medicine Peoples Council Statement at United Nations Convention on Climate Change T his statement reflects the wisdom of the Spiritual People of the Earth, of the four directions, working in unity to restore peace, harmony and balance for our collective future and for all living beings. This statement is written in black and white with a foreign language that is not our own and does not convey the full depth of our concerns. All Creation has a right to live and survive on this Sacred Earth and raise their Families where the Creator placed them to be. The Creator created the People of the Earth out of the Land and gave us a Way of Life. This Sacred Way of Life has been passed down generation-to-generation since the beginning of the Creation of Life. The sanctity of this Way of Life has been violated and abused by people who are living without regard for the well being of Mother Earth and our collective future. We, the Original Caretakers of Mother Earth, have no choice but to follow and uphold the Natural Law, which sustains the continuity of Life. We recognize our umbilical connection to Mother Earth and understand that she is the source of life, not a resource to be exploited. We speak on behalf of all Creation today, to communicate an urgent message that man has gone too far, placing us in the state of survival. There is no more time for discussion on preventing Climate Change. That opportunity has passed. Climate Change is here. The Air is not the same anymore. Indigenous delegation issues statement to UN at Climate Change talks in Paris See Indigenous delegation, Page 6 Gay marriage is legal but not on all tribal lands By FELICIA FONSECA FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) C leo Pablo married her longtime partner when gay weddings became legal in Arizona and looked forward to the day when her wife and their children could move into her home in the small Native American community outside Phoenix where she grew up. That day never came. The Ak-Chin Indian Community doesnt recognize same-sex marriages and has a law that prohibits unmarried couples from living together. So Pablo voluntarily gave up her tribal home and now is suing the tribe in tribal court to have her marriage validated. I want equal opportunity, Pablo said. See Gay Marriage, Page 4 In this Nov. 9, 2015, photo, Cleo Pablo, left, and her wife, Tara Roy-Pablo, stand outside their home in Phoenix. Pablo married her longtime partner when gay weddings became legal in Arizona and looked forward to the day when her wife and their children could move into her home in the small Native American community outside Phoenix where she grew up. The Ak- Chin Indian Community doesn't recognize same-sex marriages and has a law that prohibits unmarried couples from living together. AP Photo by Matt York By JIM CAMDEN SPOKANE, Wash. (AP/Spokesman-Review) W ithout Lucy Covington, there would probably be no Colville Confederated Tribes today, and no Eastern Washington reservation for the 12 bands that make up the confederation. Some other reservations in the United States might be gone, too, and their tribal members scattered. Covington, whose name will be on a new center for Native American students at Eastern Washington University, rose from a reluctant candidate for the Colville Tribal Business Council to a nationally EWU names campus center for Convington See John Trudell, Page 22 recognized leader for Indian rights and sovereignty and an advocate who had the ear of powerful congressmen. Along the way she encouraged young Native American men and women to stay in school to get the kind of education theyd need to be future leaders. She led the fight against a federal policy called termination, which offered members of Native American tribes cash payments in exchange for their reservation lands. And she won. Without Lucy, wed be done, said Mel Tonasket, a former Colville tribal chairman and longtime council member. She not only saved us, she influenced a lot of other young leaders. Among those young leaders was Tonasket himself, who tried to decline when Covington asked him to run for tribal council, saying he was no politician and had even been too shy to speak up in See EWU names campus, Page 4 Lucy Convington in an undated photo.

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